New in Des Moines

Jul 21

nvansistine:

lianabrooks:

britegreenstar:

libraryadvocates:

lalie:

The fact that the ALA shared this link is so gloriously bitter and angry and I love it.

Is there a portmanteau for that? Angritter? Bangry? 

My library card already gets me multiple “real” books, e-books, audiobooks, magazines and movies per month. For free.

Kindle Unlimited offers nothing from big presses, and no guarantee the authors will get paid fairly for their work. Libraries buy the book up front for a higher price (and a better binding). Kindle Unlimited offers the authors a variable percentage of a as-yet-undetermined-and-unannounced amount of money. 
While Amazon touts Kindle Unlimited at “Netflix For Books!” the reality is Netflix signed contracts with everyone whose work they offer so that actors, screen writers, best boys, and the rest of those people get paid for the shows and movies you watch. Amazon does not.
That means your favorite author isn’t being compensated for their time or work. If you love a book series and want to see the next one get published: buy the book or hit the library. Starving authors quit writing because they like eating. 

Most libraries offer these services for free already - even ebooks and audio books. The fact that Amazon isn’t paying it’s authors is super shady though :/


If you really want to do this sort of thing, you can join Oyster, which has books from the big publishers and which pays authors once you’ve read a certain percentage of the book.

nvansistine:

lianabrooks:

britegreenstar:

libraryadvocates:

lalie:

The fact that the ALA shared this link is so gloriously bitter and angry and I love it.

Is there a portmanteau for that? Angritter? Bangry? 

My library card already gets me multiple “real” books, e-books, audiobooks, magazines and movies per month. For free.

Kindle Unlimited offers nothing from big presses, and no guarantee the authors will get paid fairly for their work. Libraries buy the book up front for a higher price (and a better binding). Kindle Unlimited offers the authors a variable percentage of a as-yet-undetermined-and-unannounced amount of money. 

While Amazon touts Kindle Unlimited at “Netflix For Books!” the reality is Netflix signed contracts with everyone whose work they offer so that actors, screen writers, best boys, and the rest of those people get paid for the shows and movies you watch. Amazon does not.

That means your favorite author isn’t being compensated for their time or work. If you love a book series and want to see the next one get published: buy the book or hit the library. Starving authors quit writing because they like eating. 

Most libraries offer these services for free already - even ebooks and audio books. The fact that Amazon isn’t paying it’s authors is super shady though :/

If you really want to do this sort of thing, you can join Oyster, which has books from the big publishers and which pays authors once you’ve read a certain percentage of the book.

(via motezart)

Jul 19

A People's History of Tattooine (with tweets) · tcarmody -

Oh my gods, y’all. This is epic nerdery in action.

Jul 18

flavorpill:

No, it wasn’t a weird recurring dream you had when you were a kid.  ’Dinosaurs’ was a real show and we haven’t seen anything like it since.

It lasted like 20 seconds, but when I say “not the momma!” I get knowing nods.

flavorpill:

No, it wasn’t a weird recurring dream you had when you were a kid.  ’Dinosaurs’ was a real show and we haven’t seen anything like it since.

It lasted like 20 seconds, but when I say “not the momma!” I get knowing nods.

Jul 17

“Dawn is a color
I am condemned to describe” — From “NYC Postcards,” from DJ Dolack’s Whittling A New Face, which Allyson Paty reviews at The Rumpus. (via therumpus)

(via therumpus)

IKEA, making jokes like it’s 1995.

IKEA, making jokes like it’s 1995.

Jul 15

thelilnan:


phoenix:


This always bugged me about sports fans.
“NEEEERD!”  “You, sir, are wearing cheese.”


I think about this all the time



There is no nerdier group than fantasy sports players. They obsess over the tiniest details.

thelilnan:

phoenix:

This always bugged me about sports fans.

“NEEEERD!”  “You, sir, are wearing cheese.”

I think about this all the time

There is no nerdier group than fantasy sports players. They obsess over the tiniest details.

(Source: hawk222, via violetcoil)

Jul 14

As many as 15 percent of freshmen at America’s top schools are white students who failed to meet their university’s minimum standards for admission, according to Peter Schmidt, deputy editor of the Chronicle of Higher Education. These kids are “people with a long-standing relationship with the university,” or in other words, the children of faculty, wealthy alumni and politicians.

According to Schmidt, these unqualified but privileged kids are nearly twice as common on top campuses as Black and Latino students who had benefited from affirmative action.

” — Ten myths about affirmative action (via sociolab)

The legacy system is an abomination.

(via whoneedstransitions)

2014 Reading List Book 42: Dawn by Octavia Butler -

It’s the first book in what was once known as the Xenogenesis Series but was republished as part of Lilith’s Brood. One of my favorite things that Butler does is that she makes the assumption that humanity as we are familiar with it now is not the only option, and that some outside force (or internal one, as in the Patternmaster series) can radically change what we think of as humans. Here she has aliens who are experts at genetic manipulation act as the force for change.

The other thing she was masterful at was at finding a reasonable premise and then letting the story go off in an odd yet reasonable direction given the circumstances. So in this book, a small group of radicals have gotten hold of a nuclear weapon and used it thus setting off a nuclear war which not only kills most human life, but also creates a nuclear winter. All very plausible—so much so that the Department of Defense has gamed it out in multiple scenarios. The odd part? There are aliens, the Oankali, who’ve been orbiting Earth (beyond the moon’s orbit) who pluck some survivors from the surface and put them in stasis while they study them with an eye toward allowing them to repopulate the planet. And then it gets weird. There’s interspecies sex, the ship is a living organism, there’s gene transfer and hybridization, there’s tentacles (gods are there tentacles), and so on. I won’t get into plot details, but suffice to say it’s a complex and engaging story. I can’t wait to get into part 2.

Jul 12

pleatedjeans:

via

pleatedjeans:

via

(via goldendandelion)

Jul 10

2014 Reading List Book 41: The Other Wind by Ursula K LeGuin -

Okay NOW I’m finished with the Earthsea series. I’ll admit, I’m so captured by this place that I’d read anything she wrote about it. I think one of the reasons I’ve stayed so interested in this series is that she didn’t make it a single person’s story. She let people who’d been minor parts of other stories have their own stories to tell and put the people who’d been heroes in previous books on the sidelines rather than removing them from the story completely.It helped keep the stories fresh.

Current reading: Power of Two by Joshua Shenk is the Rumpus Book Club selection for this month; Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte is the older book I’m working through right now; and Cynthia Hogue’s Revenance is the poetry collection I’m currently embedded in.